Creating-In-Place

VIRTUAL EXHIBITION

Creating-In-Place: See what Kirkland’s Colorado artists have been up to!

Kirkland Museum is one of the few institutions providing an in-depth look at the history of Colorado art from traditional through modern, which has provided the foundation for local contemporary artists. Colorado painters, sculptors, printmakers and ceramists continue to make important contributions not only to our state and the West, but also to America’s art history."

Hugh Grant, Founding Director & Curator

To learn more about Colorado art, click here.

Earlier this summer we reached out via email to artists with work currently on view at Kirkland Museum to check in and see what they’ve been doing and how they’re dealing with ongoing social distancing and any other impacts of COVID-19. We asked these questions:

Are you currently making art?
Where are you working?
Are you doing any work that is a direct response to the pandemic?

We’ve gathered their replies and are happy to present them here. Click on any image to enlarge it.

T.S. Berger

My big order for the year has always been the awards for the 4th of July running race in Fort Collins, the FireKracker 5K. I completed the final kiln firing Memorial Day weekend. About the time I unloaded the last kiln I found out that the race was postponed until 2021. I am currently packing them for storage.

I put on a hat as my last haircut was in December and I look like a wild man. Anyway, since I was in the studio working daily on the awards, the Stay at Home and the Safer at Home directives really didn’t bother me. Stay Well.”

T.S. Berger’s work can be seen in Kirkland Museum’s Colorado Ceramics Corridor 17

Catherine Carilli

During the time of Pandemic, I am working on small Earth Art, and also abstract paintings based on nature, about hope for a new world. My Earth Hearts are of cement cast in the dirt combined with flowers, bark, and branches. I am honoring nature as there is no virus in sunshine and dirt, only hope.”

 Catherine Carilli’s work can be seen in Kirkland Museum’s Admissions Foyer

Martha Daniels

I have been working away in the studio, preparing for a show of my ceramic work and some paintings about mid‐July, at Mary Mackey's Denver Gallery, Urban Mud. (Mary will be announcing dates and more info later.) Attached is a ceramic plant form in the studio just finished for that exhibition.

I was also recently honored with a grant from the DesertX Foundation, which has been used for art materials for the show at Urban Mud and other works in progress.”

Martha Daniels’ work can be seen in Kirkland Museum’s Sculpture Gallery 10 and Colorado Ceramics Corridor 17

Robert Delaney

I have worked on a sculpture for Michael Paglia’s and Mark Brasuell’s show Lavender Mist: Gay Men in Contemporary Art in Colorado that was just installed on the second floor of the McNichols Building, making scones, and growing a beard.

When I am making larger scale work, I generally share a studio. Sometimes I have the space to myself, but not always. To reduce the possibility of coming in close contact with others, I primarily built this one at home. It is nice to work outside.

The image is me working on ATE6 (Coming of Spring), which is the one I've built for the McNichols show.”

Robert Delaney’s work can be seen in Kirkland Museum’s Sculpture Gallery 10 and Postmodern Gallery 8

James Dixon

“Still sheltering in place at home. I have completed two significant works, iron and mixed media. Also working on one and one quarter life size Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. statue.

I do pray that God continues to protect Hugh, the Kirkland staff and supporters."

James Dixon’s work can be seen in Kirkland Museum’s Sculpture Gallery 10 and Modern Gallery 7

Sushe Felix

I want as a visual artist to stay focused on producing the most positive and uplifting artwork I can at this time. I want my work to not only make the viewer feel hopeful but also peaceful and know that there is still magic and joy in the world around us. I will do my best to create compositions full of both movement and peaceful stillness that depict the beauty of the world we live in.”

Sushe Felix’s work can be seen in Kirkland Museum’s Modern Gallery 7 and Sculpture Gallery 10

Tracy Felix

I have been getting a lot of work done during the lockdown. My lifestyle is kind of based on isolation so being alone and painting is not unusual for me. I do think I am working on paintings that express positivity and are uplifting.”

Tracy Felix’s work can be seen in Kirkland Museum’s Modern Gallery 7

Jutta Golas

I am very fortunate to be able to work in my studio despite the pandemic. The galleries have reopened and several commission requests arrived. This is the latest one I just finished and ready for shipment. I am looking forward to come and visit the Kirkland.”

Jutta Golas’ work can be seen in Kirkland Museum’s Colorado Ceramics Corridor 17

Victoria Hansen

I'm at my home studio making work and building my new wood fired kiln. Thank you! Stay safe and healthy.”

Victoria Hansen’s work can be seen in Kirkland Museum’s Sculpture Gallery 10 and Colorado Ceramics Corridor 17

Kim Harrell

I have been working on and have completed several private commissions including brooches for fellow Kirkland artist Emilio Lobato; ramped up my on-line presence and selling capabilities. I received an SBA Advance (grant) and qualified for a generous SBA Disaster Loan. I have completed and submitted work to three exhibitions; lost one gallery (closed due to COVID) but gained another.”

Kim Harrell’s work can be seen in Kirkland Museum’s Sculpture Gallery 10

Joseph Hutchinson

In 2005, I retired as professor emeritus of architecture at Texas A&M University, moved to Santa Fe, NM, and resumed my art career. I still do some social protest paintings and the one on the easel is my The Four Horseman Of The Apocalypse In The Time Of COVID 19.”

Joseph Hutchinson’s work can be seen in Kirkland Museum’s Modern Gallery 7

Homare Ikeda

My daily routine has not changed much. I get up early in the morning and work on my drawing of the day then move to the paintings. The challenge of making something with what I have at home is fun. I built a three stringed musical instrument with materials I found. A new idea keeps coming in.”

Homare Ikeda’s work can be seen in Kirkland Museum’s Postmodern Gallery 8

Eric Jorgensen

I have been fortunate to have my studio and kilns in the basement of my house so I have been able to continue working during the pandemic. I have been experimenting with recycled glass, as well as seeing how long I can grow my beard during this time of sequestration.”

Eric Jorgensen’s work can be seen in Kirkland Museum’s Postmodern Gallery 8

Tony Ortega

“Like many other artists, all of my exhibits have been postponed, canceled or closed to the public. In these challenging times of anxiety, uncertainty and insecurity, I find small glimpses of things good and positive. I am creatively revitalized, especially the last few months, I've been reconnecting with the artist in me, all my creative energy is focused on working in the studio and spending time with my wife.

Thanks to social distancing and the introvert in me it has created a mixed blessing. I have finished older work that needed touch ups, I have hand colored some etchings, created some on-line workshops and finally I have updated my website.”

Tony Ortega’s work can be seen in Kirkland Museum’s Temporary Exhibition Gallery 12

Louis Recchia

At this time, it's safer for me to paint from home instead of my studio. It's an adjustment, but I'm getting a lot accomplished trying to make work relevant to the times we're living through. You can view what I've been up to on my website.”

Louis Recchia’s work can be seen in Kirkland Museum’s Colorado Ceramics Corridor 17

Michael Roper

Michael Roper, 2020 Artist Check-in

The pandemic has been rough on me and my family as we lost my Dad to the coronavirus in early March right when everything got crazy. I was out of the shop for about 6 weeks with the state shutdown and have just recently started working again. My first project back in the shop has been making an urn for my father. In this pic I am working on the cap for his urn. I hope all is well with everyone at the museum and can’t wait to come and visit again. Thanks a bunch.”

Michael Roper’s work can be seen in Kirkland Museum’s Sculpture Gallery 10

Dean Sartori

While home schooling my 7-year-old granddaughter, I continue to paint. She enjoys hanging with me in my studio. She did this painting of the virus which is displayed on our front porch.”

Dean Sartori’s work can be seen in Kirkland Museum’s Arts & Crafts Gallery 3

Shelley Schreiber

I have been very fortunate to be able to go to my studio during the pandemic. Now, I and other members, go into our co‐op studio wearing masks and sanitizing surfaces after working.

Initially, I spent time organizing, cleaning, reconstituting glazes and stains that had been waiting for my attention for a long time. After that, I started working on testing for new colors and approaches to surface decoration. And now I am back in art‐making mode and am mixing it up between hand‐built sculptural forms and thrown work."

Shelley Schreiber’s work can be seen in Kirkland Museum’s Colorado Ceramics Corridor 17

Elizabeth Yanish Shwayder

One of the most important events in my life was becoming a member of Kirkland, and meeting you, Hugh. Having the first one-person exhibit in the new building was an extremely rare and important event. Life has taken a turn for every human being in this world. I pray that it will become what it was before, and we can open those front doors soon and enjoy the beauty of Kirkland. My love and gratitude to you and all those involved. I miss all of you. More than I can say."

Elizabeth Yanish Shwayder’s work can be seen in Kirkland Museum’s Sculpture Gallery 10 and Studio Exhibition Room 14

Maynard Tischler

Thank you for the opportunity to share. Here is my limerick:

Though I work no more with clay each day
I sketch and draw what I think using just pen and ink
So here is a look, at some pics from my book
That my sweet daughter Sarah just took"

Maynard Tischler’s work can be seen in Kirkland Museum’s Entry Foyer, Sculpture Gallery 10 and Colorado Ceramics Corridor 17

Ray Tomasso

Ray Tomasso passed away unexpectedly on June 25 after responding to us. Our thoughts are with Diane and their family and friends.

Here I’m social distancing inside the boundaries of the studio, power‐sanding the edges of a new 90” x 72” commission on the outdoor easel. Will next begin painting and sealing the paper surface and casting a second, larger piece measuring 87” x 130”. Working in isolation and will continue to do so into the foreseeable future or until COVID‐19 vaccine.”

Ray Tomasso’s work can be seen in Kirkland Museum’s Sculpture Gallery 10

Tim Wedel

Tim Wedel, 2020 Artist Check-in

I restored a 1937 Singer sewing machine and taught myself how to sew during the ‘Stay at Home’ orders. Making face masks is like throwing mugs in the studio. Once you get enough mistakes out of the way, the product begins to look good.”

Tim Wedel’s work can be seen in Kirkland Museum’s Colorado Ceramics Corridor 17

Jerry Wingren

Jerry Wingren, 2020 Artist Check-in

Stay Healthy! Stay Safe!"

Jerry Wingren’s work can be seen in Kirkland Museum’s Sculpture Gallery 10

Dave Yust

Presently, numerous study/exploratory drawings are underway for 25 circularly‐shaped Baltic birch plywood structures waiting to be stretched with canvas. A view in my studio with left painting in tertiary reds; right painting, in tertiary blues; below my right arm, a chain hanging in a catenary curve; de Kooning long brushes on far right."

Dave Yust’s work can be seen in Kirkland Museum’s Promenade Gallery 2 and Temporary Exhibition Gallery 12

Sheryl Zacharia

I have been working as diligently as ever during this Pandemic. Having a home studio has allowed me to fill the hours with what I love to do most, and so I continue to work on a new challenging series of Stacked pieces which enable me to go larger and explore interesting complexities of form. This current work straddles a conversation between geometry and fluidity."

Sheryl Zacharia’s work can be seen in Kirkland Museum’s Sculpture Gallery 10

This virtual exhibition was curated by Christopher Herron. Page design by Maya Wright. Logo design by Peri Marketing & Public Relations, Inc.

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